In order to save their home from foreclosure, a group of misfits set out to find a pirate's ancient treasure. All Ages. Adults $6, Children (12 and under) $5.

Jan 31

Jan 31

Doors open at 6:30 pm Starts at 7:00 pm All ages

Price: $5-$6

Event Information

Mikey Walsh and Brandon Walsh are brothers whose family is preparing to move because developers want to build a golf course in the place of their neighborhood -- unless enough money is raised to stop the construction of the golf course, and that's quite doubtful. But when Mikey stumbles upon a treasure map of the famed "One-Eyed" Willy's hidden fortune, Mikey, Brandon, and their friends Lawrence "Chunk" Cohen, Clark "Mouth" Devereaux, Andrea "Andy" Carmichael, Stefanie "Stef" Steinbrenner, and Richard "Data" Wang, calling themselves The Goonies, set out on a quest to find the treasure in hopes of saving their neighborhood. The treasure is in a cavern, but the entrance to the cavern is under the house of evil thief Mama Fratelli and her sons Jake Fratelli, Francis Fratelli, and the severely disfigured Lotney "Sloth" Fratelli. Sloth befriends the Goonies and decides to help them.

Acclaimed indie supergroup including A.C. Newman, Dan Bejar, and Neko Case, known for their pristine harmonies and ambitious takes on classic pop.

Feb 10

Feb 10

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Price: $25-$30

Event Information

The New Pornographers' sixth album, Brill Bruisers, has a name that brings multiple connotations to mind, all of them apt, since band founder A.C. Newman acknowledges liking "titles that, in my mind, could have five different meanings." But you wouldn't steer yourself wrong if you gathered from the name that what you are about to hear will be both brainy and pugilistic. If you could put a face on an album title, this one might be represented by a boxer's mug with a monocle. A reference to "brilliant bruisers" occurs in what became the title track, "and it was shortening it to 'brill' which made me think of the whole Brill Building connotation," Newman says. "Even though I hesitate to give it any exact meaning, I like the idea that it's bruising songs in the style of the Brill Building," the legendary office tower where the greatest pop songwriters of the 1960s pumped out their classics. "Or, it makes sense as just short for brilliant. The whole idea of being a brilliant bruiser–isn't that what everybody ultimately strives for, or what a person needs to succeed in this world? To be really intelligent and really strong at the same time? It just seemed to match this group of songs somehow." This is a set of bruisers four years in the making, as several of the collective's more prominent members have been otherwise occupied by their day jobs, or moonlighting. Newman issued a solo album last year, while Dan Bejar found acclaim with another record with his other band, Destroyer; Neko Case was doing her usual under-her-own-name world conquering. Yet the promise of New Pornography continues to bring these disparate talents together just as it has since the first album they made back in 2000, Mass Romantic–a then-lark that now shows up on so many lists of the best albums of the 20th century, it borders on counting as classic rock. Newman has learned to not resist the terms that writers have always applied to the Pornographers to reflect the unusual nature of the lineup. "The irony is that as the years go on, these things become less true and more true," he laughs. "We weren't a 'supergroup' at the beginning, but now we arguably are. The band means different things for different people. For Dan and Neko, it's a side project. For me, ironically, it's a career, and my solo career is just something I dabble in. But who else has all these people in the band? Look at us. When you consider that Neko's as popular as she's ever been and Dan's coming off Kaputt, the biggest Destroyer record yet, it's like: Yeah, we're a fucking supergroup!" Mantle accepted. On Brill Bruisers, bassist/producer John Collins returns to the co-pilot's chair that he inhabited on the Pornographers' first three albums. The band's last couple of recordings, made without Collins as primary producer, had slowed down a bit from their original indie-power-pop ethos, and Newman's latest solo album went for "a Glen Campbell vibe." Having gotten the singer/songwriter stuff somewhat out of his system, Newman decreed early in the going that this Pornographers album needed to be "shinier and faster." To that end, a couple of very specific touchstones were invoked. "Before we started the record, I was talking to Dan and I remember saying, 'Yeah, I want to go with a slight Sigue Sigue Sputnik vibe.' I think he took me very literally on that," Newman chuckles. "So he sped up all of his songs quite a bit. And I had to speed up my songs as well, because I thought 'My songs can't be slow when his are so fast!' So that Sigue Sigue Sputnik comment really served its purpose." That covers the "faster" part, but what about the "shinier"? "We were going for 'Xanadu'," Newman says. Just in case there's any doubt, he is not alluding to Citizen Kane but directly referencing, yes, the roller-disco movie to which ELO contributed much of the soundtrack. Brill Bruisers doesn't just draw inspiration from Jeff Lynne's genius in general but from the synth sounds of a very specific two- or three-year period in that group's career. "It's basically Discovery, Xanadu, Electric Dreams ELO pretty much," he allows. "There are a lot of influences that I try and avoid when they come up, but that's not one of them. If something sounds like ELO, I think, yes, let's do this! It feels like everybody's influenced by the same bands nowadays, but if you're going to be influenced by early Depeche Mode, why not just move over and be influenced by early '80s ELO?" But maybe think Secret Messages meets Surfer Rosa, because there's a deep and propulsive core almost constantly thundering away under those celestial flourishes. "On this record, I think what we wanted to do was bridge the gap between a sort of late '70s/early '80s ELO synth-pop and just being a rock band. I thought, why can't we have these arpeggiators swirling but at the same time be a driving rock band with loud guitars? That was one spot where I felt: this is a space that we can currently inhabit in rock music, because there's nobody else doing this." It wasn't just a matter of picking up vintage keyboard sounds, but also using all the modern technology and apps at their disposal. "Not that we're trying to make EDM, but we've never been afraid to use as much modern technology as possible. So there are a lot of loud sections in songs like "Champions of Red Wine" and "Dance Hall Domine" that have very chopped-up sounds. I think of taking a sample of a men's choir and chopping it up with a square-wave tremolo... and really embracing the artificiality of those sounds. But at the heart of it, there's nothing artificial about the band that's playing it. It's real bass, real drums, real guitars." And real sentiments. Newman didn't necessarily want to get as introspective on Brill Bruisers as he was on his last solo album, 2012's Shut Down the Streets, where he dealt with the death of his mother and birth of his son. But personal concerns inevitably snuck in anyhow. "Wide Eyes" is "definitely a song about my son. Though it's not sung in a very, very literal way, that song is about how he changed my life." "Fantasy Fools" also deals with the transition from young man to family man. "Not that I feel like an old man, but you can't help, when you get in your 40s and all of a sudden you have a family, to start thinking about whether there are ways of growing older correctly." Newman was able to keep a work/family balance by making most of the album over a period of two years at his home studio in Woodstock, with Collins frequently flying in for long stays to work on the production as a duo, much as they did when they made the first three albums in the band's original home base of Vancouver. A certain amount of travel still figured in, "chasing Neko around" to Texas and Vermont, and heading back to Canada for much of the work involving the three songs written and sung by Bejar as well as contributions from drummer Kurt Dahle. The result, arrived at with some sense of leisure to get it right, "is stylistically as close as we can get to what I think I've always imagined us being," says Newman. I feel like what we did on this has always been in the back of my mind, even from the first record, but we just never did it, like using all the arpeggiators and adding that spacy synth element. It just never seemed right before, and with this record, it completely did. I feel more confident about this record than I've ever felt about anything before. My reaction to somebody not liking this record is 'Well, I don't know what else to do!'"

Ira Glass is the host and creator of the public radio program This American Life. The show premiered on Chicago's public radio station WBEZ in 1995 and is now heard on more than 500 public radio stations each week by over 1.7 million listeners. 8p Showtime

Feb 14

Feb 14

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Price: $39.50-$69.50

Event Information

Ira Glass is the host and creator of the public radio program This American Life. The show premiered on Chicago’s public radio station WBEZ in 1995 and is now heard on more than 500 public radio stations each week by over 1.7 million listeners. Most weeks, the podcast of the program is the most popular podcast in America. The show also airs each week on the CBC in Canada and on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s radio network.

Glass began his career as an intern at National Public Radio’s network headquarters in Washington, DC in 1978, when he was 19 years old. Over the years, he worked on nearly every NPR network news program and held virtually every production job in NPR’s Washington headquarters. He has been a tape cutter, newscast writer, desk assistant, editor, and producer. He has filled in as host of Talk of the Nation and Weekend All Things Considered.

Under Glass’s editorial direction, This American Life has won the highest honors for broadcasting and journalistic excellence, including several Peabody and DuPont-Columbia awards. The American Journalism Review declared that the show is “at the vanguard of a journalistic revolution.”

A television adaptation of This Ameri-
can Life ran on the Showtime network for two seasons, in 2007 and 2008, winning three Emmy awards, including Outstanding Nonfiction Series. The show has put out its own comic book, three greatest hits compilations, DVDs of live shows and other events, a “radio decoder” toy, temporary tattoos and a paint-by-numbers set. Half a dozen stories are in development to become feature films. In 2013 Ira Glass received the Medal for Spoken Language from the American Academy of Arts & Letters.

Glass is married and owns a disturbingly allergic dog

After arriving in India, Indiana Jones is asked by a desperate village to find a mystical stone. He agrees, and stumbles upon a secret cult plotting a terrible plan in the catacombs of an ancient palace. All Ages. Adults $6, Children (12 and under) $5.

Feb 20

Feb 20

Doors open at 6:30 pm Starts at 7:00 pm All ages

Price: $5-$6

Event Information

After arriving in India, Indiana Jones is asked by a desperate village to find a mystical stone. He agrees, and stumbles upon a secret cult plotting a terrible plan in the catacombs of an ancient palace.

When Dr. Henry Jones Sr. suddenly goes missing while pursuing the Holy Grail, eminent archaeologist Indiana Jones must follow in his father's footsteps and stop the Nazis. All Ages. Adults $6, Children (12 and under) $5.

Feb 21

Feb 21

Doors open at 6:30 pm Starts at 7:00 pm All ages

Price: $5-$6

Event Information

When Dr. Henry Jones Sr. suddenly goes missing while pursuing the Holy Grail, eminent archaeologist Indiana Jones must follow in his father's footsteps and stop the Nazis.

One of America’s foremost comediennes continues to venture across an ever-widening range of media, starring in television, theater, motion pictures, animation and video. *Please note that this performance has been rescheduled for March 5, 2015 at 8:00pm.*

Mar 5

Mar 5

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Price: $49.50-$69.50

Event Information

PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS PERFORMANCE HAS BEEN RECHEDULED FOR MARCH 5, 2015. ALL TICKETS WILL BE HONORED.



DSP

Lily Tomlin is an award-winning star of stage and screen, known especially for comedic performances going back to her days on TV's Laugh-In in the early 1970s. She grew up in Detroit, but went to New York in 1965 to be a performer. Tomlin became a regular cast member of the comedy sketch show Laugh-In in late 1969, and soon became one of the most popular players, thanks to recurring characters such as Ernestine the telephone operator and Edith Ann, a sagacious five year-old. Tomlin left the show in 1973, having released two successful comedy records of her own, the Grammy-winning This Is A Recording (1971) and the Grammy-nominated And That's The Truth (1972, as Edith Ann). She's had a stellar career, one that includes an Oscar nomination for her performance in Robert Altman's Nashville (1975), as well as hit films such as The Late Show (1977), Nine to Five (1980, with Jane Fonda and Dolly Parton) and Flirting With Disaster (1996, starring Ben Stiller). She's won Emmys for writing TV specials in 1974, 1976, 1978 and 1981, and been a regular cast member on Murphy Brown (1996-98), The West Wing (2002-06), Damages (2010, the third season) and Desperate Housewives (2008-09). Her one-woman Broadway show in 1977, Appearing Nitely, earned a special Tony award, and she won another Tony for her performance in The Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe, a 1985 one-woman show co-written with her longtime life and writing partner, Jane Wagner. A frequent stage performer who pops up in small TV and film roles, Tomlin is also a 2003 recipient of the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor.

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Creating a Living History

"I keep telling you, you listen to me more, you live longer!" Anyone up for back-to-back Indiana Jones flicks in February? WE ARE! Friday February 20th -- Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom Saturday February 21st -- Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade Get your tickets TODAY!

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107 West State Street
(607) 277-8283
Ithaca, NY 14850

Box Office Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 11am-4pm

On show days the Box Office will be open 2 hours before advertised door time in addition to our normal hours.

State Theatre of Ithaca Inc. is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization that owns and operates Tompkins County’s last remaining historic theatre. Our mission is to enhance the cultural life of Ithaca and the Finger Lakes by preserving, operating and promoting the historic State Theatre as an active venue for national, international and community performances and programming.