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EVENTS

with Special Guests Donna the Buffalo

Dec 5

Dec 5

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Price: $25-$35

Event Information

DSP

From their days playing together as teenagers to their current acoustic and electric blues, probably no one has more consistently led American music for the last 50 years — yes! — than Jorma Kaukonen and Jack Casady, the founders and continuing core members of Hot Tuna.
The pair began playing together while growing up in the Washington D.C. area, where Jack’s father was a dentist and Jorma’s father a State Department official. Four years younger, Jack continued in junior high, then high school — while playing professional gigs as lead guitarist at night before he was old enough to drive — while Jorma (who had played rhythm guitar to Jack’s lead) started college in Ohio, accompanied his family overseas, then returned to college, this time in California.
Along the way, Jorma became enamored of, then committed to, the finger-picking guitar style exemplified by the now-legendary Rev. Gary Davis. Jack, meanwhile, had taken an interest in the electric bass, at the time a controversial instrument in blues, jazz, and folk circles.
In the mid 1960s, Jorma was asked to audition to play guitar for a new band that was forming in San Francisco. Though an acoustic player at heart, he grew interested in the electronic gadgetry that was beginning to make an appearance in the popular music scene — particularly in a primitive processor brought to the audition by a fellow named Ken Kesey — and decided to join that band; soon thereafter he summoned his young friend from Washington, who now played the bass.
Thus was created the unique (then and now) sound that was The Jefferson Airplane. Jorma even contributed the band’s name, drawn from a nickname a friend had for the blues-playing Jorma. Jack’s experience as a lead guitarist led to a style of bass playing which took the instrument far beyond its traditional role.
While in The Jefferson Airplane, putting together the soundtrack of the 60s, the pair remained loyal to the blues, jazz, bluegrass, and folk influences of the small clubs and larger venues they had learned from years before. While in San Francisco and even in hotel rooms on the road, they would play together and worked up a set of songs that they would often play at clubs in the Bay Area and while on the road, often after having played a set with the Airplane. This led to a record contract; in fact, they had an album recorded before they decided to name their band Hot Tuna. With it they launched on an odyssey which has itself continued for more than 35 years, always finding new and interesting turns in its path forward.
The first thing an early Hot Tuna fans discovered at their concerts of the early 1970s was that the band was growing louder and louder. In an era in which volume often overtrumped musicianship, Hot Tuna provided both. The second thing a fan would discover was that Jack and Jorma really loved to play. “Look around for another band that plays uninterrupted three- to six-hour sets,” wrote reviewer Jerry Moore. What Moore could not have known was that had there been no audience at all, they would have played just as long and just as well, so devoted were they to making music. Of course, the audience wasn’t superfluous by any means; it energized and continues to energize their performances. Album followed album — more than two dozen in all, not counting solo efforts, side projects, and appearances on the albums of other bands and performers — and they continued to develop their interests and styles, both together and in individual pursuits. In an era in which old bands reunite for one last tour, Hot Tuna can’t because Hot Tuna never broke up.
Along the way, they have been joined by a succession of talented musicians: Drummers, harmonica players, keyboardists, backup singers, violinists, mandolinists, and more, all fitting in to Jorma and Jack’s current place in the musical spectrum. And along the way there was no list of outstanding guitarists that didn’t include Jorma, nor was there anyone who seriously thought there is a better bass player than Jack.
After two decades of acoustic and electric concerts and albums, the 1990s brought a new focus on acoustic music to Hot Tuna. More intimate venues with a more individual connection to the audience became increasingly frequent stops. Soon, the loud electric sound (and the semi trailer load of equipment) disappeared entirely from Hot Tuna tours. Maturity brought the desire to do things not instead of but in addition to being a touring band. Both had become interested in teaching, passing along what they had learned and what they had uniquely developed to a new generation of players.
In 1998 Jorma and his wife Vanessa opened Fur Peace Ranch Guitar Camp, in the beautiful rolling Appalachian foothills of southeastern Ohio.
Here, on a sprawling and rustic yet modern campus, musicians and would-be musicians come for intensive and enjoyable workshops taught by Jorma, Jack, and other extraordinary players, learning things that range from different styles of playing to songwriting and even storytelling (the musician in performance has to say something while changing that broken string!), to making a song one’s own.
In addition, there is now BreakDownWay.com, a unique interactive teaching site that comes closest of anything yet to make individual instruction available to students anywhere there is a computer and an Internet connection.
But the teaching doesn’t replace Hot Tuna’s busy tour schedule; it’s in addition to the tours. Nor have they lighened up their individual schedules. Jack released his first solo CD, Dream Factor, on Eagle Records in 2003. He has a busy and elaborate website at jackcasady.com. Jorma has a website, too, and achieved enormous critical acclaim and a Grammy nomination for his 2003 solo album, Blue Country Heart. (Both are in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame due to their pioneering work in The Jefferson Airplane.) As 2006 began, they launched another exciting website, Hot Tuna Tunes, where fans may inexpensively download professionally made recordings of full Hot Tuna concerts in both MP3 and lossless encodings, suitable for portable player and home-burned CDs respectively. Hot Tuna Tunes is added to all the time, so it’s almost as if Hot Tuna were releasing numerous live concert albums every year. Collect the entire set!
For the last few years, Jorma and Jack have been joined in most of their Hot Tuna performances by the mandolin virtuoso Barry Mitterhoff. A veteran of bluegrass, Celtic, folk, and rock-influenced bands including “Tony Trischka and Skyline” and “Bottle Hill,” Barry has found a new voice in working with Hot Tuna, and the fit has been good — watching them play, it’s as if he’s been there from the beginning and they’re all having the time of their lives.
Jorma and Jack certainly could not have imagined, let alone predicted, where playing would take them. It’s been a long and fascinating road to numerous exciting destinations. Two things have never changed: They still love to play as much as they did as kids in Washington D.C., and there are still many, many exciting miles yet to travel on their musical odyssey.

“1964: The Tribute” takes their audiences on a musical journey to an era in rock history that will live in all of our hearts forever. All Ages.

Dec 6

Dec 6

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Price: $19.50-$36.50

Event Information

Since the early 80's, “1964”…The Tribute has been thrilling audiences all over the globe with what Rolling Stone Magazine has called the “Best Beatles Tribute on Earth ”.

“1964” …The Tribute takes their audiences on a musical journey to an era in rock history that will live in all of our hearts forever. They are hailed by critics and fans alike as the most authentic and endearing Beatles tribute in the world.

Choosing songs from the pre-Sgt. Pepper era, “1964” astonishingly recreates an early 60’s live Beatles concert, with period instruments, clothing, hairstyles, and onstage banter.

Over 25 years of researching and performing have made “1964” masters of their craft.

Come see why “1964”…The Tribute is the definitive Beatle show!

Dec 7

Dec 7

Doors open at 2:30 pm Starts at 3:00 pm All ages

Price: $5

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Founded in 1992, Sabor Latino Dance Ensemble strives to educate the Cornell University and surrounding Ithaca community about Latino culture through music, dance, and visual arts. We are the first Latino dance troupe on Cornell University's campus and represent our Latin American and Caribbean roots through dances such as Merengue, Plena, Mambo, Bachata, Cumbia, and Flamenco, as well as our ties to our experience as Latinos in the U.S. through dances such as Salsa (on 1 and on 2), Latin-jazz, Latin hip-hop, Reggaeton, and Latino house. Through our annual concert, workshops, and community service, we present the significance of music and dance in our cultures.

SPECIAL VIP PACKAGE ($50.00): includes a Gold Circle Reserved Seat, VIP laminate/lanyard, and priority Meet & Greet after the show.

Dec 7

Dec 7

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Price: $26.50-$50

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Voted one of Variety’s “10 Comics to Watch,” Ralphie May has released, a record-setting, four one-hour comedy specials and will be releasing two more this year, proving that his relatable comedic genius is in higher demand than ever. In addition, he recently released a vintage comedy album recorded in Houston in 1998 and his new line of barbecue sauce called “Fat Baby Jesus.” Lovable enough to get away with anything, Ralphie continues to capture the hearts of thousands on his sold out tours and promises to make you gleefully uncomfortable.
Since his debut on season one of “Last Comic Standing,” audiences can’t get enough of the larger than life comedian. Ralphie has a proven track record of selling out multiple shows in venues of all sizes. He has a no nonsense point of view and the ability to connect with a diverse audience by pointing out society’s hypocrisies. Ralphie doesn’t shy away from touchy topics or ethnic jokes, nor does he bite his tongue when society suggests, because he sincerely believes that as long as what he’s saying is true, people need to hear it.
Born on February 17, 1972 in Chattanooga, Tennessee and raised in Clarksville, Arkansas, Ralphie was one of four kids raised by his single mom. At the age of seventeen he won a contest to open for his idol, Sam Kinison. He later moved to Houston to develop his comedy routine, at Kinison’s suggestion. “All the comics I’ve ever admired, whether it be Kinison, Lenny Bruce, Buddy Hackett or Richard Pryor, all share a commonality,” says May. “They’re a tour de force. When they speak, there’s no room for rebuttal. They’ve thought it all out. Even the pros and cons of their argument, they raise openly and debate in the midst of their conversation and it’s a beautiful thing to watch.”
On the small screen, Ralphie has worked as a writer and producer on ESPN's “Mohr Sports” starring Jay Mohr and performed stand-up on numerous late night talk shows including four appearances on CBS's “The Late Late Show w/ Craig Kilborn” as well as eleven appearances on “Jimmy Kimmel Live.” He has appeared on “The Man Show” and MTV’s “Bash” as well as guest-starred on NBC’s “Whoopie.” As if that’s not enough, he’s also one of a handful of comedians to have received a standing ovation on “The Tonight Show w/ Jay Leno.”
When he’s not on the road, Ralphie divides his time between Nashville and Los Angeles with his beautiful wife Lahna, their wonderful dog Hoochie Mama, and their two children, April June May and August James May. He contributes much of his time and energy to helping others. Since establishing a residence in Nashville, he has been actively involved with the 100 Club of Nashville, various youth organizations and the Humane Society.

Ithaca Ballet’s Nutcracker is a treat for the whole family and an Ithaca tradition. Children of all ages will delight in Clara's victory over the mice and her voyage to the Land of Sweets.

Dec 12

Dec 12

Doors open at 6:30 pm Starts at 7:30 pm All ages

Price: $12-$22

Event Information

The Nutcracker
Choreographed by Lavinia Reid, music by Tchaikovsky

December 12, 7:30 p.m.
December 13 at 3 p.m.
December 14 at 3 p.m.


Ithaca Ballet’s Nutcracker is a treat for the whole family and an Ithaca tradition. Children of all ages will delight in Clara's victory over the mice and her voyage to the Land of Sweets.

Ithaca Ballet’s Nutcracker is a treat for the whole family and an Ithaca tradition. Children of all ages will delight in Clara's victory over the mice and her voyage to the Land of Sweets.

Dec 13

Dec 13

Doors open at 2:00 pm Starts at 3:00 pm All ages

Price: $10-$20

Event Information

The Nutcracker
Choreographed by Lavinia Reid, music by Tchaikovsky

December 12, 7:30 p.m.
December 13 at 3 p.m.
December 14 at 3 p.m.


Ithaca Ballet’s Nutcracker is a treat for the whole family and an Ithaca tradition. Children of all ages will delight in Clara's victory over the mice and her voyage to the Land of Sweets.

Ithaca Ballet’s Nutcracker is a treat for the whole family and an Ithaca tradition. Children of all ages will delight in Clara's victory over the mice and her voyage to the Land of Sweets.

Dec 14

Dec 14

Doors open at 2:00 pm Starts at 3:00 pm All ages

Price: $10-$20

Event Information

The Nutcracker
Choreographed by Lavinia Reid, music by Tchaikovsky

December 12, 7:30 p.m.
December 13 at 3 p.m.
December 14 at 3 p.m.


Ithaca Ballet’s Nutcracker is a treat for the whole family and an Ithaca tradition. Children of all ages will delight in Clara's victory over the mice and her voyage to the Land of Sweets.

All Ages. Movie starts at 7pm.

Dec 20

Dec 20

Doors open at 6:00 pm Starts at 7:00 pm All ages

Price: $5-$6

Event Information

When Doris Walker frantically recruits a last minute replacement for a drunken Santa for Macy's Christmas parade, he seems just ideal for he job and perhaps for good reason - he says his name is Kris Kringle and that he's the real Santa Claus. She pays him no mind and at the department store, he's proving be popular as well. He seems to be able to speak many languages and knows just what kids would like to have and creates a bit of a sensation when he refers shoppers to other stores rather than Macy's. When Kris has a run-in with the Department store's psychological tester, the man tries to have him committed leading to a court case where Doris' lawyer neighbor Fred Gailey tries to prove in court that Kris is the real Santa Claus. More important to Kris throughout all of this is to get Doris and her daughter Susan to believe in him.

Fame tells the story of life in a contemporary American high school. While the story is appropriate for most audiences please note that some of the subject matter may not be suitable for younger children.

Jan 16

Jan 16

Doors open at 6:30 pm Starts at 7:00 pm All ages

Price: $13-$15

Event Information

Running to Places is a youth community theatre company that brings together middle and high school students from across the county. We're in the business of youth development, helping raise our community's children and making excellent theatre in the process.

Fame tells the story of life in a contemporary American high school. While the story is appropriate for most audiences please note that some of the subject matter may not be suitable for younger children.

Jan 17

Jan 17

Doors open at 6:30 pm Starts at 7:00 pm All ages

Price: $13-$15

Event Information

Running to Places is a youth community theatre company that brings together middle and high school students from across the county. We're in the business of youth development, helping raise our community's children and making excellent theatre in the process.

Fame tells the story of life in a contemporary American high school. While the story is appropriate for most audiences please note that some of the subject matter may not be suitable for younger children.

Jan 18

Jan 18

Doors open at 1:30 pm Starts at 2:00 pm All ages

Price: $13

Event Information

Running to Places is a youth community theatre company that brings together middle and high school students from across the county. We're in the business of youth development, helping raise our community's children and making excellent theatre in the process.

This 5th anniversary festival will feature The Traveling McCourys, the renowned fiddler Darol Anger’s new band Mr. Sun with Tony Trischka joining them on the banjo, and guitarist/singer Michael Daves joined by fiddler Brittany Haas.

Jan 24

Jan 24

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Price: $19.50-$85

Event Information

This 5th anniversary festival will feature The Travelin Mccourys, the renowned fiddler Darol Anger’s new band Mr. Sun with Tony Trischka joining them on the banjo, and guitarist/singer Michael Daves joined by fiddler Brittany Haas. All three headliners will be performing at the historic State Theatre on Saturday evening. More information to come soon!!

LIVE on stage! With every swing and flip, George takes the audience through a fun-filled adventure in which he learns about Rome…and meatballs…and the “secret ingredient” to cooking, than he'd ever imagined!

Jan 25

Jan 25

Doors open at 2:00 pm Starts at 3:00 pm All ages

Price: $10-$15

Acclaimed indie supergroup including A.C. Newman, Dan Bejar, and Neko Case, known for their pristine harmonies and ambitious takes on classic pop.

Feb 10

Feb 10

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Price: $25-$30

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The New Pornographers' sixth album, Brill Bruisers, has a name that brings multiple connotations to mind, all of them apt, since band founder A.C. Newman acknowledges liking "titles that, in my mind, could have five different meanings." But you wouldn't steer yourself wrong if you gathered from the name that what you are about to hear will be both brainy and pugilistic. If you could put a face on an album title, this one might be represented by a boxer's mug with a monocle. A reference to "brilliant bruisers" occurs in what became the title track, "and it was shortening it to 'brill' which made me think of the whole Brill Building connotation," Newman says. "Even though I hesitate to give it any exact meaning, I like the idea that it's bruising songs in the style of the Brill Building," the legendary office tower where the greatest pop songwriters of the 1960s pumped out their classics. "Or, it makes sense as just short for brilliant. The whole idea of being a brilliant bruiser–isn't that what everybody ultimately strives for, or what a person needs to succeed in this world? To be really intelligent and really strong at the same time? It just seemed to match this group of songs somehow." This is a set of bruisers four years in the making, as several of the collective's more prominent members have been otherwise occupied by their day jobs, or moonlighting. Newman issued a solo album last year, while Dan Bejar found acclaim with another record with his other band, Destroyer; Neko Case was doing her usual under-her-own-name world conquering. Yet the promise of New Pornography continues to bring these disparate talents together just as it has since the first album they made back in 2000, Mass Romantic–a then-lark that now shows up on so many lists of the best albums of the 20th century, it borders on counting as classic rock. Newman has learned to not resist the terms that writers have always applied to the Pornographers to reflect the unusual nature of the lineup. "The irony is that as the years go on, these things become less true and more true," he laughs. "We weren't a 'supergroup' at the beginning, but now we arguably are. The band means different things for different people. For Dan and Neko, it's a side project. For me, ironically, it's a career, and my solo career is just something I dabble in. But who else has all these people in the band? Look at us. When you consider that Neko's as popular as she's ever been and Dan's coming off Kaputt, the biggest Destroyer record yet, it's like: Yeah, we're a fucking supergroup!" Mantle accepted. On Brill Bruisers, bassist/producer John Collins returns to the co-pilot's chair that he inhabited on the Pornographers' first three albums. The band's last couple of recordings, made without Collins as primary producer, had slowed down a bit from their original indie-power-pop ethos, and Newman's latest solo album went for "a Glen Campbell vibe." Having gotten the singer/songwriter stuff somewhat out of his system, Newman decreed early in the going that this Pornographers album needed to be "shinier and faster." To that end, a couple of very specific touchstones were invoked. "Before we started the record, I was talking to Dan and I remember saying, 'Yeah, I want to go with a slight Sigue Sigue Sputnik vibe.' I think he took me very literally on that," Newman chuckles. "So he sped up all of his songs quite a bit. And I had to speed up my songs as well, because I thought 'My songs can't be slow when his are so fast!' So that Sigue Sigue Sputnik comment really served its purpose." That covers the "faster" part, but what about the "shinier"? "We were going for 'Xanadu'," Newman says. Just in case there's any doubt, he is not alluding to Citizen Kane but directly referencing, yes, the roller-disco movie to which ELO contributed much of the soundtrack. Brill Bruisers doesn't just draw inspiration from Jeff Lynne's genius in general but from the synth sounds of a very specific two- or three-year period in that group's career. "It's basically Discovery, Xanadu, Electric Dreams ELO pretty much," he allows. "There are a lot of influences that I try and avoid when they come up, but that's not one of them. If something sounds like ELO, I think, yes, let's do this! It feels like everybody's influenced by the same bands nowadays, but if you're going to be influenced by early Depeche Mode, why not just move over and be influenced by early '80s ELO?" But maybe think Secret Messages meets Surfer Rosa, because there's a deep and propulsive core almost constantly thundering away under those celestial flourishes. "On this record, I think what we wanted to do was bridge the gap between a sort of late '70s/early '80s ELO synth-pop and just being a rock band. I thought, why can't we have these arpeggiators swirling but at the same time be a driving rock band with loud guitars? That was one spot where I felt: this is a space that we can currently inhabit in rock music, because there's nobody else doing this." It wasn't just a matter of picking up vintage keyboard sounds, but also using all the modern technology and apps at their disposal. "Not that we're trying to make EDM, but we've never been afraid to use as much modern technology as possible. So there are a lot of loud sections in songs like "Champions of Red Wine" and "Dance Hall Domine" that have very chopped-up sounds. I think of taking a sample of a men's choir and chopping it up with a square-wave tremolo... and really embracing the artificiality of those sounds. But at the heart of it, there's nothing artificial about the band that's playing it. It's real bass, real drums, real guitars." And real sentiments. Newman didn't necessarily want to get as introspective on Brill Bruisers as he was on his last solo album, 2012's Shut Down the Streets, where he dealt with the death of his mother and birth of his son. But personal concerns inevitably snuck in anyhow. "Wide Eyes" is "definitely a song about my son. Though it's not sung in a very, very literal way, that song is about how he changed my life." "Fantasy Fools" also deals with the transition from young man to family man. "Not that I feel like an old man, but you can't help, when you get in your 40s and all of a sudden you have a family, to start thinking about whether there are ways of growing older correctly." Newman was able to keep a work/family balance by making most of the album over a period of two years at his home studio in Woodstock, with Collins frequently flying in for long stays to work on the production as a duo, much as they did when they made the first three albums in the band's original home base of Vancouver. A certain amount of travel still figured in, "chasing Neko around" to Texas and Vermont, and heading back to Canada for much of the work involving the three songs written and sung by Bejar as well as contributions from drummer Kurt Dahle. The result, arrived at with some sense of leisure to get it right, "is stylistically as close as we can get to what I think I've always imagined us being," says Newman. I feel like what we did on this has always been in the back of my mind, even from the first record, but we just never did it, like using all the arpeggiators and adding that spacy synth element. It just never seemed right before, and with this record, it completely did. I feel more confident about this record than I've ever felt about anything before. My reaction to somebody not liking this record is 'Well, I don't know what else to do!'"

Ira Glass is the host and creator of the public radio program This American Life. The show premiered on Chicago's public radio station WBEZ in 1995 and is now heard on more than 500 public radio stations each week by over 1.7 million listeners. 8p Showtime

Feb 14

Feb 14

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Price: $39.50-$69.50

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Ira Glass is the host and creator of the public radio program This American Life. The show premiered on Chicago’s public radio station WBEZ in 1995 and is now heard on more than 500 public radio stations each week by over 1.7 million listeners. Most weeks, the podcast of the program is the most popular podcast in America. The show also airs each week on the CBC in Canada and on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s radio network.

Glass began his career as an intern at National Public Radio’s network headquarters in Washington, DC in 1978, when he was 19 years old. Over the years, he worked on nearly every NPR network news program and held virtually every production job in NPR’s Washington headquarters. He has been a tape cutter, newscast writer, desk assistant, editor, and producer. He has filled in as host of Talk of the Nation and Weekend All Things Considered.

Under Glass’s editorial direction, This American Life has won the highest honors for broadcasting and journalistic excellence, including several Peabody and DuPont-Columbia awards. The American Journalism Review declared that the show is “at the vanguard of a journalistic revolution.”

A television adaptation of This Ameri-
can Life ran on the Showtime network for two seasons, in 2007 and 2008, winning three Emmy awards, including Outstanding Nonfiction Series. The show has put out its own comic book, three greatest hits compilations, DVDs of live shows and other events, a “radio decoder” toy, temporary tattoos and a paint-by-numbers set. Half a dozen stories are in development to become feature films. In 2013 Ira Glass received the Medal for Spoken Language from the American Academy of Arts & Letters.

Glass is married and owns a disturbingly allergic dog

One of America’s foremost comediennes continues to venture across an ever-widening range of media, starring in television, theater, motion pictures, animation and video. *Please note that this performance has been rescheduled for March 5, 2015 at 8:00pm.*

Mar 5

Mar 5

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Price: $49.50-$69.50

Event Information

PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS PERFORMANCE HAS BEEN RECHEDULED FOR MARCH 5, 2015. ALL TICKETS WILL BE HONORED.



DSP

Lily Tomlin is an award-winning star of stage and screen, known especially for comedic performances going back to her days on TV's Laugh-In in the early 1970s. She grew up in Detroit, but went to New York in 1965 to be a performer. Tomlin became a regular cast member of the comedy sketch show Laugh-In in late 1969, and soon became one of the most popular players, thanks to recurring characters such as Ernestine the telephone operator and Edith Ann, a sagacious five year-old. Tomlin left the show in 1973, having released two successful comedy records of her own, the Grammy-winning This Is A Recording (1971) and the Grammy-nominated And That's The Truth (1972, as Edith Ann). She's had a stellar career, one that includes an Oscar nomination for her performance in Robert Altman's Nashville (1975), as well as hit films such as The Late Show (1977), Nine to Five (1980, with Jane Fonda and Dolly Parton) and Flirting With Disaster (1996, starring Ben Stiller). She's won Emmys for writing TV specials in 1974, 1976, 1978 and 1981, and been a regular cast member on Murphy Brown (1996-98), The West Wing (2002-06), Damages (2010, the third season) and Desperate Housewives (2008-09). Her one-woman Broadway show in 1977, Appearing Nitely, earned a special Tony award, and she won another Tony for her performance in The Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe, a 1985 one-woman show co-written with her longtime life and writing partner, Jane Wagner. A frequent stage performer who pops up in small TV and film roles, Tomlin is also a 2003 recipient of the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor.

The Golden Dragons are recognized throughout the United States and abroad as the premiere Chinese acrobatic touring company of today. All Ages.

Mar 7

Mar 7

Doors open at 2:00 pm Starts at 3:00 pm All ages

Price: $19.50-$29.50

Event Information

Danny Chang and his Golden Dragon Acrobats continue their relentless, 30+ year US touring schedule of centuries-old Chinese art form. Since 1985, they remain the only Chinese acrobatic company touring year-round in the United States, and present over 200 performances annually. In 2005, their Broadway debut and seven-week run at the New Victory Theater earned two prestigious New York Drama Desk Awards nominations (Angela Chang for Best Choreography and Danny Chang for Most Unique Theatrical Experience).

Answering the new market demand from US presenters, producer Danny Chang restructured the Golden Dragon Acrobats in 1998 to form Asian Artists Productions, Inc. or AAPI. While the new company continued to produce and tour the Golden Dragon Acrobats, AAIP expanded to create theatrically elaborate, resident-shows like Circo Magnifico, Dream, Pagoda, Cirque D’or and others, each for a specific US market.

"Cirque Zíva" is newest touring group from AAIP. The large cast and spectacular set designs illustrate the best of Chang's brand of artistic merit, high production value, and solid commitment to cultural exchange. Of special note is Cirque Zíva Lighting Director Tony Tucci, the recipient of two B. Iden Payne Awards and Critics Table awards for lighting, with credits including the video “Baryshnikov, Dancer and The Dance” and 1996 Summer Olympics Cultural Olympiad showcase. Zíva was created in 2011 for a 10-week engagement at Asbury Park Boardwalk’s Paramount Theatre, the first-ever summer run held at the venue in its more than 80-year history. An instant success in Asbury Park, earning critical acclaim and packed houses, the show burst onto the US performing arts circuit with a 55-city, 20-week premiere tour in 2013, and encore tour winter/spring 2014.

Mar 13

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Price: $35-$45

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ROBERT CRAY IN MY SOUL "First and foremost, the stories are where my heart lies," says Robert Cray. "In the blues guitar thing, most of the time, you carve out the section for the solo and that's really what the song is based on. And I love that, there's a time for that, but then I have to get back into the meat and bones of storytelling." With his seventeenth studio album, In My Soul, the five-time Grammy winner (and 15-time nominee) reasserts his position as one of his generation's great musical storytellers—this time steeped in the down-home sound and rich emotion of Southern Soul, yet never straying far from his incomparable guitar mastery. Produced by Steve Jordan, whose long list of credits includes extensive work with Keith Richards and John Mayer, the album blends funky originals with surprising covers, and captures a new configuration of the Robert Cray Band: long-time bass player Richard Cousins is joined by keyboardist Dover Weinberg (returning to the group, with which he played in the 1970s and '80s) as well as new drummer Les Falconer. Robert Cray is widely recognized as one of the greatest guitarists of our time. The New Yorker recently called him “one of the most reliable pleasures of soul and blues for over three decades now.“ He has written or performed with everyone from Eric Clapton to Stevie Ray Vaughan, from Bonnie Raitt to John Lee Hooker, and in 2011, he was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame. But when it comes time for a new recording, Cray remains as open as ever to pure creativity. "In my recollection, we have never sat down and decided what kind of record we're going to make," he says. "This time, I knew we were going to do an R&B thing, because that's what we've done whenever we work with Steve, but we didn't have a concept—that develops because of the songs and the people who play on it." The first song they worked on for In My Soul was a Booker T & the MGs-style instrumental, written by Cousins and Hendrix Ackle; making no secret of the inspiration, they gave it the winking title "Hip Tight Onions" (as in the MGs three biggest hits—"Hip Hug-Her," "Time is Tight," and "Green Onions"). "That really helped set the tone," says Cray. "We ran that song for a bit, continuously playing that groove, and we got a feel for each other, and for Steve, and for a new tune. And from there, we fell into this real funk feel." Jordan, whom Cray describes as "almost a fifth member of the band," proposed a couple of covers—Otis Redding's "Nobody's Fault But My Own" and "Your Good Thing (Is About to End)," initially recorded in 1966 by Stax artist Mable John but later turned into a hit for Lou Rawls. "When I think of Robert Cray, I think of a great singer," says the producer. "Most people gravitate to his guitar playing because he's such a gunslinger, but I don't. He's got so much soul it's ridiculous. 'Good Thing' just sounded like Robert to me—it has a touch of jazz, and that strong, Chicago-based R&B in the Lou Rawls version. With the Otis tune, I just thought, 'Robert can eat this up,' and not a lot of people can do justice to that vocal." Cray countered with the idea of doing a song that would ultimately give the album its title, "Deep in My Soul" by the late Bobby "Blue" Bland. "I didn't want to change it—just do it pretty straight up as a tribute to Bobby, who was one of my real heroes," says Cray. The bulk of In My Soul, though, is made up of original material, composed by various members of the band. The album opens with the hard-charging "You Move Me," instantly identifiable as classic Cray, with his signature slicing guitar leads woven throughout. "I Guess I'll Never Know," co-written by drummer Falconer with Jeff Paris and Rick Whitfield, adds a slipperier groove to the mix, in the style of Willie Mitchell's productions for Hi Records. Bonus track "Pillow," available on a limited edition CD version of the album, began as a melodic snippet written by the late session guitarist Jerry Friedman, which Cray extended (complete with a sitar-like guitar effect) into what Steve Jordan calls "a '70s-Blaxploitation movie kind of vibe—it's Robert as Shaft!" "All the originals that came in were really good, and that's not always the case," says the producer. "It sure made my job easier—I just had to make sure the arrangements and sound and groove were right." Perhaps most notable is "What Would You Say?," an aching tune that finds Cray longing for a better world. "It's just a response to all that's going on—wars, disease, or just someone standing outside the supermarket asking for food or for a job. That's all part of everyday life, and I just had to talk about it." In My Soul includes plenty of Cray's blazing guitar work, which Rolling Stone recently said “introduced a new generation of mainstream rock fans to the language and form of the blues.” But he maintains that he's most excited about the way in which this project presents the complete Robert Cray Band. "I like that I got to play as part of a unit, as a quartet," he says. "That, to me, is just as much fun as playing a solo. There are lots of different grooves and styles on this record, and we had to give each song its own identity. That's where we're at as a band—the most important part is to lay down a groove that's going to carry the story. The solos are just icing on the cake." This year marks Robert Cray's fortieth anniversary as a musician, and with In My Soul, he is celebrating in style. He notes, with pride and with some amusement, that he continues to see new, younger faces in his audience. "There's a younger generation now whose parents turned them on to our music," he says. "It reminds me of when I was young and going to see Buddy Guy, Albert Collins, all the blues I could. It is kind of funny to be in the position of being the older generation now. But I'm just going to continue to do what we do. I can only do what I know, and we'll see what happens." -- IN MY SOUL TRACK-BY-TRACK You Move Me—"That's just a bluesy, upbeat type of tune, talking about my loved one, talking about the way she does me. It's a fun, simple, straight-ahead square beat, a nice rocking tune." Nobody's Fault But Mine—"An Otis Redding cover. All of us in the band, we grew up listening to that kind of music, and it's pretty dear to our hearts." Steve Jordan: "I just thought, 'Robert can eat this one up.' It's got the guitar stuff, but also the singing. Not a lot of people can do justice to that vocal. Also, we were looking for song to get vocals out of Les, so we approached this Otis tune like it was a Sam and Dave song." Fine Yesterday—"I'd been working on this over the summer and fall, and just pieced it together. It kind of has the feel of an early '60s thing, a song like 'Sitting in the Park.' I thought I would just be bold and go, 'What makes you think you could do something like that?'" Your Good Thing (Is About To End)—"That was Steve's idea. The cool thing is that when he mentioned it, I said 'Fantastic!'— I always loved that tune, and Dover happens to be one of the biggest Lou Rawls fans ever, so I knew it was going to go over big. But Steve didn't want to do just that version; it's really a combination of the different versions, the original by Mable John and also the OV Wright version. Steve said, 'Let's you and me go cut it,' and just the two of us went in and did it. We didn't rehearse, just played it and tried to make it as funky as possible." I Guess I'll Never Know—"A song about somebody losing their loved one. The cool thing about this song is that it's got a really funky beat, and it's co-written by our drummer, Les Falconer. It's nice and funky, almost reminiscent of a Hi Records, Willie Mitchell production." Hold On—"This one was written by Richard Cousins and Hendrix Ackle. We played it from the music they gave us, but then we changed up the lyric a little to make it more of a '70s Philly kind of thing. It's a departure from the Memphis sound, but still in that classic soul thing." What Would You Say—"A song that's about making the world a better place. Saying 'Can we do that? Can we help homeless people, can we try to cure diseases?' It's a response to all that's going on, from wars to someone outside the supermarket asking for food or for a job, all of that is part of everyday life. I was reading about Syria and the gas attack on those children—everybody forgets about kids during war and how horrible that is. So this is just how it came out, I just had to talk about it." Hip Tight Onions—"I don't think we've ever recorded an instrumental before. This was penned by our bass player, Richard Cousins, and his writing friend Hendrix Ackle, and it's a tribute to Booker T and the MGs." You're Everything—"Just a love tune, talking about how my world has changed because of who I'm with." Deep in My Soul—"I knew I wanted to do Bobby Bland tune, and I was banging my head as to which one. Then I found one CD with a massive amount of Bland songs on it, and I hadn't heard this one for a long time. I brought it in, and everybody loved it. I didn't want to change it—just do it pretty straight up as a tribute to Bobby, who was one of my real heroes. He came to see us before he passed, about a year and a half ago, he came to a show with his wife and son and just stood in the wings, and it was such a big honor, really cool." Steve Jordan: "We had nine or ten songs recorded, but we didn't really have a deep blues song—I wanted to get that feel, something riveting that lays the gauntlet down. Robert pulled out this song, and I had never heard it before. It was haunting and very deep, and the way he sang it, I got chills. You'd be hard pressed to think you could get as good as Bland did, but Robert gave a really extraordinary performance. Put that one on and you just have to shut up!" Pillow—"Steve had sent me a piece of music by a guy named Jerry Friedman, a great session player who played on 'Supernatural Thing' and a bunch of other stuff. It wasn't complete, there was no lyric, so we just kind of put it together—we started from music we had, tried to make it funky, came up with the idea for an electric sitar sound. It sounds great as instrumental, and we may still put it out like that, but the original title was 'You're My Pillow,' so we just kind of worked a story around that."

**NOTE: All Orchestra seating is general admission. If you want reserved seating in the balcony please choose "Loge Reserved" seating.**

Apr 10

Apr 10

Doors open at 7:00 pm Starts at 8:00 pm All ages

Price: $20-$27.50

Event Information

Formed as a quartet in Chicago in 1998 and relocated to Los Angeles three years later, OK Go (Damian Kulash, Tim Nordwind, Dan Konopka, Andy Ross) have spent their career in a steady state of transformation. The four songs of the all-new Upside Out EP represent the first preview of Hungry Ghosts, due out in the fall on the band’s own Paracadute. This is the band’s fourth full-length and the newest addition to a curriculum vitae filled with experimentation in a variety of mediums. The band worked with longtime producer and friend Dave Fridmann (Flaming Lips, Weezer, MGMT), while also enlisting a new collaborator in Los Angeles, veteran Tony Hoffer, (Beck, Phoenix, Foster the People) to create their most comfortable and far-reaching songs yet. Building on (and deconstructing) 15 years of pop-rock smarts, musical friendship, and band-of-the-future innovations the EP, Upside Out, offers a concise overview of forthcoming Hungry Ghosts’ melancholic fireworks (“The Writing’s on the Wall”), basement funk parties (“Turn Up The Radio”), IMAX-sized choruses (“The One Moment”), and space-age dance floor bangers (“I Won’t Let You Down”). Drawn from the same marching orders issued to big-hearted happiness creators as Queen, T. Rex, The Cars or Cheap Trick, and a lifetime of mixed tapes exchanged by lifelong music fans, Upside Out is a reaffirmation of the sounds and ideas that brought the band together in the first place. The four songs provide an assured kick-off to a new sequence of interconnected performances, videos, dances, and wild, undreamt fun. “As the band has evolved over the last 15 years, the creative palette we work with has expanded in so many unexpected and gratifying directions,” says frontman Damian Kulash. “This record feels like it’s the musical manifestation of that — like we can speak in a clearer voice when we are playing in a bigger sandbox. Just as the band’s whole project became clearer to us as we learned to find more homes for our creativity — we triangulated it from more directions. And, I think the music itself has gotten more focused for similar reasons. We went in with fewer preconceptions of who we are or what our sound is, and came out with a record that sounds much more uniquely our own because of it.” Continuing a career that includes viral videos, New York Times op-eds, a major label split and the establishment of a DIY trans-media mini-empire, collaborations with pioneering dance companies and tech giants, animators and Muppets, OK Go continue to fearlessly dream and build new worlds in a time when creative boundaries have all but dissolved.

This is a one of a kind, family-oriented blend of NONSTOP unique physical comedy, juggling, acrobatics and balancing skills of internationally acclaimed award winner Gregory Popovich.

Apr 12

Apr 12

Doors open at 5:00 pm Starts at 6:00 pm All ages

Price: $12.50-$24.50

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The World Famous Popovich Comedy Pet Theater is a family-oriented blend of the unique comedy and juggling skills of Gregory Popovich, and the extraordinary talents of his performing pets.

Each of the show's 15 cats and 10 dogs were once strays, rescued from animal shelters.

Now, they love to show off onstage - by performing a variety of stunts and skits!

Audiences will be delighted to see this extravaganza of European-style clowns, amazing juggling and balancing acts, and of course, very talented performing pets. It's a show that both adults and kids of all ages enjoy!

Gregory Popovich, winner of many international circus competitions, and hi furry friends, buring their Comedy Pet Theater to Las Vegas after a world tour of more than 20 countries!

Apr 25

Doors open at 1:30 pm Starts at 2:30 pm All ages

Price: $10-$15

Apr 25

Doors open at 6:30 pm Starts at 7:30 pm All ages

Price: $10-$15

With a dragon who’s lost his poof, a neurotic gypsy woman and a magical cast of characters, this hilarious twist on the classic fairy tale will delight princes and princesses of all ages.

May 9

May 9

Doors open at 1:00 pm Starts at 2:00 pm All ages

Price: $8-$12

Event Information

Let your hair down in this charming new musical by Janet Yates Vogt and Mark Friedman (How I Became A Pirate). The evil enchantress Lady Za Za has banished Princess Rapunzel to the deep, dark, dank, dismal, dreary forest in an effort to rule the kingdom herself. It is up to handsome Sir Roderick and his hairdressing side-kick Edgar to restore the kingdom as they also search for true love and a perfect head of hair. Will they find everything they are looking for in Princess Rapunzel? With a dragon who’s lost his poof, a neurotic gypsy woman and a magical cast of characters, this hilarious twist on the classic fairy tale will delight princes and princesses of all ages.

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107 West State Street
(607) 277-8283
Ithaca, NY 14850

Box Office Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 11am-4pm

On show days the Box Office will be open 2 hours before advertised door time in addition to our normal hours.

State Theatre of Ithaca Inc. is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization that owns and operates Tompkins County’s last remaining historic theatre. Our mission is to enhance the cultural life of Ithaca and the Finger Lakes by preserving, operating and promoting the historic State Theatre as an active venue for national, international and community performances and programming.